Famed motivational speaker, Anthony Robbins, once said, “Nothing in life has any meaning except the meaning we give it.”

This sometimes becomes of paramount importance when a contents manager has to decide whether a given item should be “total-lossed” or restored.

A Steinway® baby grand piano that is covered in soot and can be restored is an easy choice. But how about a pinecone that was spray painted gold and liberally doused in glitter at a summer camp, then worn as an unlikely broach by “Mom” at various celebrations ever since – thus becoming a family tradition?

We have had adjusters see such things (hear the story that goes with them) and actually encourage us to restore them.

They may have no resale value, but have high intrinsic value – so much so that no price can be assigned to the items. Thus, the contents valet make a concerted effort to restore them.

Who gets to decide? Ultimately, it must always be the owner, of course. Especially when the worth of a given item might just be priceless.