Not all water damage is quickly or easily identified – unless you are a trained and experience Contents Project Manager. Let’s say that a family has returned from a storm shelter to find that their home was inundated by flood waters. They drag all their wet items outside. They dry out the home with fans, they sanitize the kitchen counters with bleach, but overlook the refrigerator’s built in filter. A boil order went out for the neighborhood, so they boil their drinking water, but the ice maker just kept right on producing bacteria-laden cubes, with no one the wiser.

Contents Managers have written many protocols that include such contingencies, families often don’t.

Or imagine that an upstairs sink sprung a leak while the family was on vacation. The resulting flood worked its way downstairs and into a seemingly innocent toaster. The structural team dries out the house, but no one considers that the interior of the appliance might still be wet or that the moisture corroded the wiring. The contents valet don’t miss such hazards. For them, it is all in a day’s work.

Or maybe there was a fire, and droplets from the hoses penetrated a bank of computers at a small business headquarters. The Contents Manager won’t allow the power to be turned on to the building unless and until she (he) unplugs all electric devices – otherwise they may all become instant doorstops!

You can count on the contents valet to save you money on virtually every job – sometimes before they even begin their inventory.

And by the way, many contents specialists can restore wet electronics nowadays – so you might say, they can save such items twice.